Banana Craze

Francois Bucher, United (edition of 3), 2004-2005, 12 RC photographs on aluminium
Francois Bucher, United (edition of 3), 2004-2005, 12 RC photographs on aluminium

In 1871 the American entrepreneur Minor Keith won a contract with the government of Costa Rica to build a railroad from the capital city of San José to the port city of Limón. The project would modernize the country and increase exports, like in Chile and Peru, following the industrial expansion of the U.S. But before the Costa Rican railroad was complete in 1890, the government defaulted on its payments and renegotiated a deal which gave Keith’s company 800,000 acres of tax-free land along the railway and a 99-year lease on its operation.

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Santiago Arau. Territorios

Santiago Arau, Puebla desde el Iztaccíhuatl, 2019, color digital print, image courtesy of Museo Amparo
Santiago Arau, Puebla desde el Iztaccíhuatl, 2016, color digital print, image courtesy of Museo Amparo

For seven years, a man explored the length, width, and height of the territory of Mexico. He traveled 33,302 kilometers, documenting the borders, cities, mountains, and volcanoes that shape the country. The explorer, Santiago Arau, is a photographer and filmmaker whose project, Territorios, is the subject of an exhibition at the Museo Amparo in Puebla.

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The Lost da Vinci?

Andrea del Verrocchio, Christ and Saint Thomas, 1467-1483, image © Musée du Louvre / Antoine Mongodin

In October 2019, the Louvre opened an unprecedented exhibition of works by Leonardo da Vinci. The show marked 500 years since the death of the Renaissance master and it was the largest-ever collection of his works brought together in one place. After more than ten years of research and planning, the once-in-a-lifetime exhibition offered an exhaustive catalogue of da Vinci’s oeuvre and set a record for attendance. One excluded painting, though, is a problematic footnote.

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Reality Projector

Ólafur Elíasson, Reality Projector, 2018; Installation view at the Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles; photo © codylee.co
Ólafur Elíasson, Reality Projector, 2018; Installation view at the Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles; photo © codylee.co

At the Marciano Art Foundation in Los Angeles, a massive installation by Ólafur Elíasson creates an immersive experience that, unusually these days, encourages visitors to take their time inside the space.

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Calder in the Alps

Alexander Calder, Six Planes Escarpé, 1967; installation view near Gstaad; sheet metal, bolts and paint; 119 x 156 x 150 in inches; photo by Jon Etter, © 2016 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS, London, courtesy of Calder Foundation, New York / Art Resource, New York and Hauser & Wirth
Alexander Calder, Six Planes Escarpé, 1967; installation view near Gstaad; sheet metal, bolts and paint; 119 x 156 x 150 in inches; photo by Jon Etter, © 2016 Calder Foundation, New York / DACS, London, courtesy of Calder Foundation, New York / Art Resource, New York and Hauser & Wirth

A temporary outdoor sculpture exhibition has opened in the Swiss Alps with installations of six works by Alexander Calder. Presented by Hauser & Wirth and the Calder Foundation, Calder in the Alps takes place in and around the posh resort town of Gstaad.

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Ólafur Elíasson at the Château de Versailles

Ólafur Elíasson, The Gaze of Versailles, 2016; installation view at the Château de Versailles; photo by Anders Sune Berg, © Ólafur Elíasson
Ólafur Elíasson, The Gaze of Versailles, 2016; installation view at the Château de Versailles; photo by Anders Sune Berg, © Ólafur Elíasson

Each summer since 2008, the Château de Versailles presents a contemporary monographic exhibition by a guest artist. For the ninth edition in 2016, Ólafur Elíasson has installed a series of site-specific works – three in the gardens and six inside the palace – to produce new perceptions of the iconic site.

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Ólafur Elíasson, Baroque Baroque

Ólafur Elíasson, Five Orientation Lights, 1999; Stainless steel, colored glass, halogen bulbs, Fresnel lenses, each lamp: 200 x 70 x 70 cm, installation: dimensions variable; The Juan & Patricia Vergez Collection, Buenos Aires; Baroque Baroque installation view at the Winter Palace of Prince Eugene of Savoy, Vienna, 2015; image © Ólafur Elíasson
Ólafur Elíasson, Five Orientation Lights, 1999; Stainless steel, colored glass, halogen bulbs, Fresnel lenses, each lamp: 200 x 70 x 70 cm, installation dimensions variable; The Juan & Patricia Vergez Collection, Buenos Aires; Installation view at the Winter Palace of Prince Eugene of Savoy, Vienna, 2015; image © Ólafur Elíasson

At the Winter Palace in Vienna, a selection of works by Ólafur Elíasson forms a site-specific exhibition titled Baroque Baroque. More than a dozen works, created during the last twenty years, are installed within the architecture of the 18th century palace. The contrast of Elíasson’s contemporary works inside grand Baroque staterooms alters perceptions of space and history for an experience that supersedes both.

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Power and Pathos at the Getty Museum

Torso of a Youth, “The Vani Torso,” 200–100 B.C. Bronze, 105 cm x 45 cm x 25 cm; Georgian National Museum, Vani Archaeological Museum-Reserve; Installation view of "Power and Pathos" at the Getty Museum, 2015; photo © codylee.co
Torso of a Youth, “The Vani Torso,” 200–100 BC; bronze, 105 cm x 45 cm x 25 cm; Georgian National Museum, Vani Archaeological Museum-Reserve; Installation view of “Power and Pathos” at the Getty Museum, 2015; photo © codylee.co

During the Hellenistic period – from the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC to the establishment of the Roman Empire in 31 BC – Greek power and cultural influence were at their peak throughout the Mediterranean and Macedonia. The vast empire was controlled by dozens of generals and rulers, and a new market for portraits was formed with the development of bronze as a primary artistic medium.

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