Paris Photo Los Angeles Recap

Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co
Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co

We gave an overview of Paris Photo Los Angeles last week in anticipation of its third edition.  The weather was characteristically perfect in LA and the satellite edition of the Paris fair now seems quite established.  News feeds on both coasts were full of Paris Photo Los Angeles for an entire week before early Instagrams began to appear from the Venice Biennale.

 

The New York backlot at Paramount Pictures Studios in Hollywood; Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co
The New York backlot at Paramount Pictures Studios in Hollywood; Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co

The four-day event began on Thursday evening with a private preview, and was open to the public on Friday through Sunday.  More than 16,000 visitors were reported by Saturday evening, surpassing last year’s total with Sunday still ahead.  Final figures may exceed 22,000, which is impressive growth for a young fair on a crowded schedule.

 

The Melrose Gate at Paramount Pictures Studios in Hollywood; Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co
The Melrose Gate at Paramount Pictures Studios in Hollywood; Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co

VIP guests entered Paramount Pictures Studios through the gate on Melrose.  It is classic Hollywood.  The New York backlot hosted about two dozen galleries and art book dealers in brownstone facades.  The remaining two-thirds, many of the best galleries, set up in three vast soundstage buildings.

From the 70 galleries representing 265 artists, these were our favorites:

 

NASA archive, Breese Little, installation view at Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co
NASA archive, Breese Little, installation view at Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co

In Stage 14, Breese Little (London) had an archive of historic NASA photographs.  The installation seemed modest, but consider that these were among the first images ever seen of Earth and the moon from space.

 

Axel Hütte, Palazzo Barbarigo Minotto, Italy, 2012; inkjet print on glass on polished stainless steel, 28 3/4 x 24 1/2 inches, edition of 6; image © Axel Hütte, courtesy of Galerie Nokolaus Ruzicska, photo by codylee.co
Axel Hütte, Palazzo Barbarigo Minotto, Italy, 2012; inkjet print on glass on polished stainless steel, 28 3/4 x 24 1/2 inches, edition of 6; image © Axel Hütte, courtesy of Galerie Nokolaus Ruzicska, photo by codylee.co

In Stage 32, Galerie Nikolaus Ruzicska (Salzburg) installed a series of works by Axel Hütte.  The fantastic images provided a sense of depth, and even a lenticular effect, due to a unique process of inket print on glass backed by polished stainless steel.

 

Ralph Gibson, MJ with Surf, 1979; gelatin silver print, 50 x 60 inches, edition of 6; image © Ralph Gibson, courtesy of Etherton Gallery
Ralph Gibson, MJ with Surf, 1979; gelatin silver print, 50 x 60 inches, edition of 6; image © Ralph Gibson, courtesy of Etherton Gallery

Etherton Gallery (Tucson) had a series of nudes by Ralph Gibson.  The best two among them, even without color, projected a very luxurious feeling of the warm sun on bronzed skin.

 

Nadav Kander, Priozersk XIV (I was told she once held an oar), Kazakhstan, 2011; c-print, edition of 30; image © Nadav Kander, courtesy of Flowers Gallery
Nadav Kander, Priozersk XIV (I was told she once held an oar), Kazakhstan, 2011; c-print, edition of 30; image © Nadav Kander, courtesy of Flowers Gallery

In Stage 31, Flowers Gallery (London and New York) selected works from Nadav Kander’s Dust series, which explores incredibly aesthetic Cold War architectural ruins.

 

Boomoon, Naksan #4277, 2010; laserchrome print, face-mounted on diasec, artist's frame, 61 1/4 x 77 1/8 inches, edition of 6; image © Boomoon, courtesy of Flowers Gallery
Boomoon, Naksan #4277, 2010; laserchrome print, face-mounted on diasec, artist’s frame, 61 1/4 x 77 1/8 inches, edition of 6; image © Boomoon, courtesy of Flowers Gallery

Also at Flowers, Boomoon’s beautifully printed Naksan seascape seemed temporal and almost abstracted.

 

Murray Fredericks, Salt 203, 2007; pigment print, 47 x 58 inches, edition of 7; image © Murray Fredericks
Murray Fredericks, Salt 203, 2007; pigment print, 47 x 58 inches, edition of 7; image © Murray Fredericks

Back in Stage 32, Hamiltons (London) had a sublime photograph by Murray Fredericks.  Large format sunsets can be both trite and sublime.

 

François Fontaine, Silenzio!, 2012; installation view at Leica, Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image courtesy of La Vida Leica
François Fontaine, Silenzio!, 2012; installation view at Leica, Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image courtesy of La Vida Leica

The hipster camera maker Leica was a sponsor of Paris Photo LA.  Leica’s booth included artists’ models of cameras in various materials, and an installation of François Fontaine’s Silenzio!  The blurry film stills were especially fitting in the movie studio venue.

 

The VIP Lounge at Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co
The VIP Lounge at Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co

The fair’s official partner is BMW, which provided valet and car service.  Ruinart provided champagne and hosted the VIP Lounge.  Other sponsors included amanasalto, JP Morgan, United Talent Agency, Barneys, and Zadig & Voltaire.

 

Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co
Paris Photo Los Angeles, 2015; image © codylee.co

The 19th edition of Paris Photo will take place from November 12 to 15 at the Grand Palais.  Save the date for Paris Photo Los Angeles in 2016 – the 4th edition is already confirmed for Paramount Pictures Studios.

 

Also see our preview of this year’s fair at codylee.co/paris-photo-los-angeles/

 

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